Digestion of fat

Digestion of fat

The digestion of fat, unlike other nutrients, does not happen mainly in the mouth and stomach, but only in the small intestine. For this purpose, the fats, together with the not entirely broken down carbohydrates and proteins are passed in portions through the duodenum into the small intestine. Here, the stomach acid is first neutralized through alkaline fluids (e.g. from the pancreas), so that the enzymes of the pancreas and certain glands in the small intestine can also aid digestion with enzymes.

Subsequently, the fats are broken down by the bile acids into the smallest fat droplets and then decomposed by the pancreatic enzyme lipase. The decomposed fats are absorbed by the intestinal mucosa and reassembled on site into fat molecules. The fat then enters the bloodstream via the lymphatic vessels and eventually reaches the body’s cells, where it either serves to build up structures in the body (hormones, cell membrane, etc), burned for energy (like simple sugars) or deposited in the fat deposits of the body (body fat).

 

Fat along with carbohydrates? Better not…