Myths in bodybuilding

The biggest myths in training & bodybuilding

Modern bodybuilding is increasingly becoming a scientific discipline. It is always surprising that many myths from the beginnings of the sport still seem to be in the heads of many people. This is all the more interesting when you consider that the education and qualifications of trainers, as well as the educational field in modern training literature has reached a quality that a few years ago for a sport such as bodybuilding was considered totally unlikely. The reason for this is the increasing involvement of bodybuilding principles in the training of almost every sport.

For example, in the past, strength training was considered to be the reason why an athlete becomes slower and more immobile, but today it seems to be the key to success. The physiques of many athletes today, as in some modern sprinters, would not even have looked so bad on a bodybuilding stage a few years ago.

It begs the question: If the knowledge is actually getting better, why is it not used by so many? Why are people still wasting so much time with ineffective methods? Sure, it is not necessary today for a trainer or a gym owner to even have to go to college. On the contrary, many simply pass on their experiences that they have made over time. Some of these trainers are even more knowledgeable than others who have been professionally trained and educated by specific institutions. However, the courses are still tailored to the recreational athlete rather than the special type of bodybuilder or strength athlete or even the fitness enthusiast. Sadly, many so-called “qualified” trainers seem to throw off their learned knowledge after their training to continue spreading myths from the Stone Age. The only reason for this can be that these ideas got so stuck in their heads that some people think that they have to be true.

All the more reason to clean up once and for all with these most popular myths:

  1. The shape of a muscle cannot be changed
  2. There is no “fat burning pulse”
  3. Abdominal training does not burn belly fat
  4. Squats are not bad for your knees
  5. A cutting phase does not require higher repetition numbers
  6. No excessive(!) caloric surplus is needed to build muscle
  7. There are no mass and definition exercises
  8. Women do not have to train differently than men
  9. Once you stop exercising, your muscles will not automatically turn into fat
  10. Strength training does not make you stiff and immobile

 

The shape of a muscle cannot be changed

There is no “fat burning pulse”

Abdominal training does not burn belly fat

Squats are not bad for your knees

A cutting phase does not require higher repetition numbers

No excessive(!) caloric surplus is needed to build muscle

There are no mass and definition exercises

Women do not have to train differently than men

Once you stop exercising, your muscles will not automatically turn into fat

Strength training does not make you stiff and immobile